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[We Are One Festival Review]: Crazy World

Directed by Nabwana I.G.G, comes the Wakaliwood production, Crazy World. A film that tackles child kidnapping, but in the process of taking the children of the Ugandan village, the child-snatching gang accidentally kidnaps the Waka Starz. A group of smaller action heroes in Uganda who are masters at Kung-Fu, and it is up to them to set themselves free from their captors. In the new “supa action movie”, Crazy World is as crazy as one could expect, and a promising introduction to the production process of film in a much smaller, less funded infrastructure. One that directly contradicts the typical process of the United States’ Hollywood system. 

The story here is relatively sub-par. A very familiar tale of revenge and vengeance for various characters, but that isn’t important to the film whatsoever. What is important is the genuine joy and well-intentioned thrills of Crazy World. What starts with a massive anti-piracy ad at the beginning of the film, filmed in the heart of Wakaliwood, continues with its low budget production, and a movie probably hasn’t felt as genuine. While we’re all entangled within the Hollywood system and Hollywood dictating the type of tone and style of movies we see, Wakaliwood is its own type of beast. It defies so much logic and typical, conventional film-making tropes, not because it is intended to be that way, but because the funds, nor the infrastructure are there as well. 

This is prevalent in so many aspects beyond its narrative structure that sees so many characters cast with iconic Wakaliwood stars, but in the costume design, clear lack of production design, and yet the movie has so much charm to it that it’s not important if the movie makes logical sense. What is important is the blunt messages and fun making a movie can provide. It’s not emotionally complex, full of glamorous setpieces, but the Waka Starz of Wakaliwood provides the right amount of thrills, laughs, and action to provide a sense of unbridled fun. All while exclaiming the fears of child kidnapping in Uganda, the stupidity of its police outright ignoring the issues at hand, the criminals being taken down by an empowering child cast for the youth of Uganda. I can’t speak directly to the experiences of living in Uganda, but in watching this film, my introduction to Wakaliwood, it’s clear that this is a part of their everyday struggles. Although it’s more fun than a biting commentary on the systems put into place failing the society beneath them, the charm and poignancy are still there. 

Crazy World is electric. A non-stop romp of 60 minutes with lots of laughs and plenty to be shocked by considering it’s Hollywood defiant methods. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen, and something that urges me to dive deeper into the various film-making structures across the world that are severely underfunded, and driven by the passion for the art form, instead of the money. There’s a gleaming sense of optimism to this that is encouraging, and simultaneously upsetting. It’s encouraging for the voices out there who don’t need a massive budget to create something birthed out of passion. Upsetting for the voices who are being swallowed here in the States in favor of what can make the most money in one weekend. Not that there isn’t a place for the system in Hollywood, but there is something much purer in seeing a film made by a group of people who just want to provide low budget thrills with their friends and family. That’s all this film is, and looking for anything more, or particular, is unjust to a film that is driven by smiles and laughter.

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[We Are One Festival Review]: Crazy World
SUMMARY
Just as crazy as the title promises. A fundamentally broken, technically inefficient movie that abolishes all logical forms of storytelling and film-making in exchange for pure laughter and joy. The prime example of a Wakaliwood production.
PROS
Passionate Filmmaking
Action & Cast
CONS
Shallow Story
4

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